Why Saskatchewan Placenames are More Tempting than a Cinnabon!



Saskatchewan Place Names

These Saskatchewan Placenames are listed alphabetically to determine which Saskatchewan Gen Web Region is needed for genealogical or historical research.  The closer you get to your intended search area, the more likely you are to find what you need.

Genealogists may break through a brick wall in their research, or connect with long lost cousins by finding research information such as local history books, cemeteries, school yearbooks, cattle brands, Henderson's Directories, census records, or voting records.  These examples of sources can be ascertained once the area of Saskatchewan can be determined.

Posting a query on the relevant Saskatchewan region posting board, or joining a Saskatchewan regional mailing list to connect with fellow researchers are amazing methods of networking.

If an ancestral document, letter or correspondence cites a place of habitation, it is fantastic to know where in Saskatchewan this place might be located.  Saskatchewan has an area of 651,900 square kilometres (251,700 sq mi).  Both the eastern and western borders are 1,225 kilometres (761 mi) long.  The southern international border separating Saskatchewan, Canada and the United States is  is 627 kilometres (390 mi).  The northern border dividing the land of the North West Territories and the province of Saskatchewan is 445 kilometres (277 mi).

Saskatchewan land south of the tree line was surveyed for homestead applications, and land sales.  According to Information Services Corporation (ISC) "Saskatchewan started to be surveyed in 1871 with the First System of Survey. The Second System of Survey was done in 1880 with the intent of making all quarters surveyed up to that point roughly the same size. The Third System of Survey began in 1881 and is still in use today. This Third System was actually modified in 1919 - 1920 to benefit veterans of the First World War, who were allocated an additional 80 acres adjoining their quarter sections, held in reserve until they developed their home quarters."

The records held at the Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan are those submitted by the Saskatchewan Land Titles Office.  These records contain the application forms for those applying for a homestead.  The homesteader name and their legal land location can be searched at either Saskatchewan Homestead Index Project (SHIP) or in the Pre-1930 Homestead File Series (S 42)-Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan

The legal land description defines rural land blocks by township, range and meridian.  By querying the Canadian Geographical Names database or the Post Offices and Postmasters - Library and Archives Canada the legal land description for placenames can be ascertained.  Successful homesteaders and their legal land description for their land allotment can be found at Land Grants of Western Canada, 1870-1930-Library and Archives Canada.  

In these webpages are listed alphabetically the placenames of Saskatchewan, cities, towns, villages, hamlets, post offices, rail sidings, and unincorporated places and to which Saskatchewan regional area they belong to best find resources and assistance.  Those places allocated for the First Nations, Rural Municipalities, and School Districts are not included in this particular listing.


  • Placenames of the province of Saskatchewan. (Post 1905)

  • Placenames of the North West Territories  (1882-1905). NWT provisional districts: Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, and Athabaska 

Saskatchewan Gen Web Regions

The province of Saskatchewan is divided into regions to help genealogists make local connections with fellow researchers


 A few of the many and several sources for the listing compilation
Our roots - Canada's Local Histories Online - this web site is undergoing a change to a new URL and new formatting.

Title: People places : Saskatchewan and its names
Author: Barry, Bill (William R.) , University of Regina. Canadian Plains Research Center,
Maps
Archives
Cemeteries
Location query?  Any entry with a year in the comments column can be found in the post office and postmaster database at Library and Archives Canada (LAC) and any entry with a star can be found in the historical  maps listings.

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How do the Saskatchewan 2011 Canadian Census Statistics Compare to History?

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Saskatchewan Lost Places:



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